2024/06/14
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Wild Pig Nuisance

Ecology & habits  

Adult wild pig
Piglet
 

Wild Pig (Sus scrofa) is a common and widespread native mammal in Hong Kong.  Adults can weigh up to 200 kg and reach a body length up to 2 m.  They have thick and short bristly coats ranging from brownish grey to black.  Piglets are light brown with darker stripes on their coat for camouflage.  This pattern typically fades within the first six months to one year of age.  Adult males possess tusks that protrude from the corners of their mouth.

Wild pigs have successfully adapted to the various habitats, including forests, grasslands, and rural areas.  They are primarily herbivorous, consuming a range of plant materials such as grass, roots, tubers, and fallen fruits.  However, they are opportunistic omnivores and will also scavenge for food, including insects, small animals, and even human food waste found in garbage.

In general, wild pigs are secretive and wary of human contact.  However, if provoked or threatened, they may become aggressive and potentially attack humans, especially adult males and sows with piglets.

Problems caused by feeding wild pigs

Some people enjoy feeding wild pigs and even have concerns that the animals might be starving in the wild, believing that they should be fed regularly like pets.  However, there is already an abundance of natural food available for wild pigs in countryside areas, and they do not require human feeding.  In fact, human feeding can lead to the following negative consequences:

  • Given the strong reproductive capacity and adaptability of wild pigs and the lack of natural predators, feeding would facilitate the rapid proliferation of wild pig population.

  • Human feeding encourages wild pigs to roam and gather in residential or urban areas, causing nuisance to the public and potentially even resulting in traffic accidents.

  • Frequent contact with humans has caused some wild pigs to lose their natural fear of humans.  As a result, their behavior may become increasingly aggressive, posing a danger to the general public.  This can also increase the risk of disease transmission.

  • Leftover food can lead to environmental hygiene problems.

Preventive measures for wild pig nuisance

Some wild pigs intrude into villages and urban areas in search of food, causing disturbance and damage of crops and personal properties. In order to reduce the nuisance caused by wild pigs, preventive measures are recommended as follows:

  • Do not feed any wild or stray animals, as food remains will attract wild pigs to congregate near the feeding sites;

  • Manage outdoor rubbish bins properly or use animal-proof rubbish bins to reduce any possible food sources for wild pigs; and

  • Erect sturdy fences to protect crops or use infrared auto-trigger audio or lighting devices to deter wild pigs. 

How to handle encounters with wild pigs

  • When encountering wild pigs, remain keep calm, stay away and leave them undisturbed;

  • Do not touch any wild pigs, including piglets;

  • If necessary, take cover behind barriers and wait for the wild pigs to leave before continuing;

  • Do not throw objects at or try to chase away the wild pigs away, as it may provoke them and lead to danger;

  • Do not corner wild pigs or block their escape routes; and

  • If disturbed by wild pigs, you can call 1823 to notify this department for follow-up.  In case of an emergency, you should immediately call 999 to request police assistance.

Wild Animals Protection Ordinance

According to the current Wild Animals Protection Ordinance (Cap. 170) ("the Ordinance"), feeding of wild animals (including wild pigs, monkeys and wild birds) is prohibited across the entire territory of Hong Kong.  Offenders may be prosecuted and subject to a maximum fine of $10,000 upon conviction.  To further curb illegal feeding activities and strengthen deterrence effect, the Government has submitted the Wild Animals Protection (Amendment) Bill 2023 ("the Bills") to the Legislative Council in November 2023.  The Bill increases the maximum penalty for illegal feeding to a fine of $100,000 and imprisonment for one year; introduces a fixed penalty system with a fine of $5,000 for illegal feeding; and expands the categories of enforcement officers, etc.  The Bill has been passed by the Legislative Council and will come into effect on 1 August 2024.  

Wild Pig Capture Operation

Since November 2021, AFCD has launched regular wild pig capture operations at urban and rural sites with large numbers of wild pigs, and those sites with past injury cases or with pigs which may pose risks to members of the public.  Furthermore, upon receiving reports about wild pig sightings in urban areas or residential areas from citizens or other government departments, the AFCD will also perform ad hoc operations to capture the wild pigs which pose potential danger or cause nuisance to members of the public.   In recent years, AFCD has further allocated resources to increase the frequency of capture operations, and enhanced the operation efficiency by making use of online surveillance camera and new animal traps.  

Since November 2021, AFCD has captured and dispatched 1,032 wild pigs as at 14 June 2024. The number of wild pigs captured and humanely dispatched are as follows.

 

Number  Date Location No. of Wild Pigs
1. to 360. November 2021 to December 2023

PDF File

360 Capture Operations, humanely dispatched 809 wild pigs

361. 3 January 2024 Coombe Road 1
362. 3 January 2024 Cyberport 1
363. 4 January 2024 Severn Road 3
364. 4 January 2024 Coombe Road 1
365. 4 January 2024 A housing estate in Siu Lek Yuen 2
366. 4 January 2024 Pok Chuen Street 3
367. 5 January 2024 Severn Road 1
368. 9 January 2024 Tsiu Hang 3
369. 9 January 2024 Pik Tin Street 1
370. 10 January 2024 Fanling 1
371. 10 January 2024 Fu Tei Road 2
372. 10 January 2024 Tai Tam Reservoir Road 3
373. 10 January 2024 Aberdeen 2
374. 10 January 2024 Cyberport 3
375. 11 January 2024 Wing Chuk Street 1
376. 16 January 2024 Coombe Road 1
377. 16 January 2024 Fu Tei Road 2
378. 17 January 2024 Caritas Medical Centre 1
379. 18 January 2024 Ting Yat Road 4
380. 18 January 2024 Hilltop Road 3
381. 19 January 2024 Kin Wah Street 1
382. 19 January 2024 Tin Hau Temple Road 1
383. 22 January 2024 Hilltop Road 1
384. 24 January 2024 Hilltop Road 1
385. 24 January 2024 Silver Cape Road 2
386. 24 January 2024 Clear Water Bay Road 1
387. 25 January 2024 Nam Fung Road 6
388. 25 January 2024 Tin King Road 5
389. 25 January 2024 King San Path 4
390 26 January 2024 Shek O 1
391. 30 January 2024 Tung Tsz Shan Road 4
392. 30 January 2024 Hilltop Road 1
393. 30 January 2024 Shek O 1
394. 30 January 2024 Tin Hau Temple Road 1
395. 30 January 2024 Coombe Road 1
396. 30 January 2024 Borrett Road 1
397. 31 January 2024 Bowen Road 1
398. 31 January 2024 Hilltop Road 1
399. 31 January 2024 Kau Sai Chau 5
400. 1 February 2024 Ma Lok Path 2
401. 6 February 2024 Peel Rise 3
402. 6 February 2024 Mount Austin Road 1
403. 6 February 2024 Hatton Road 3
404 10 February 2024 Shui Choi Tin Village 1
405. 15 February 2024 Pik Sha Road 1
406. 20 February 2024 Chi Fu Road 1
407. 20 February 2024 Cyberport 1
408. 20 February 2024 Shek O 2
409. 20 February 2024 Tung Tsz Shan Road 1
410. 21 February 2024 Tung Tsz Shan Road 4
411. 21 February 2024 Chi Fu Road 1
412. 29 February 2024 Hilltop Road 1
413. 29 February 2024 Fanling 1
414. 29 February 2024 Lam Kam Road 1
415. 29 February 2024 Greig Road 2
416. 29 February 2024 Aberdeen 3
417 1 March 2024 Lam Kam Road 1
418. 5 March 2024 Tung Tsz Road 1
419. 14 March 2024 Braemar Hill Road 1
420. 14 March 2024 Stanley 2
421. 20 March 2024 Tung Tsz Shan Road 1
422. 22 March 2024 Tin King Road 1
423. 25 March 2024 Hilltop Road 1
424. 26 March 2024 Che Ha 1
425. 27 March 2024 Chai Wan Road 1
426. 27 March 2024 Caritas Medical Centre 1
427. 28 March 2024 Tin King Road 1
428. 2 April 2024 Hong Kong Park 1
429. 3 April 2024 Chai Wan Road 2
430. 3 April 2024 Tai Po Hospital 1
431. 9 April 2024 Chi Fu Road 1
432. 9 April 2024 A housing estate in Tin Sam, Tai Wai 1
433. 10 April 2024 Chai Wan Road 1
434. 11 April 2024 King San Path 2
435. 11 April 2024 Che Ha 1
436. 12 April 2024 Caritas Medical Centre 1
437. 18 April 2024 Peel Rise 1
438. 18 April 2024 Tai Hang 2
439. 20 April 2024  Tun Yu Road 1
440. 24 April 2024 Ko Chiu Road 3
441. 25 April 2024 Braemar Hill Road 1
442. 26 April 2024 Siu Lam 1
443. 7 May 2024 Severn Road 1
444. 7 May 2024 Peel Rise 1
445. 7 May 2024 Yau Sin Street 1
446. 9 May 2024 Fu Tei Road 4
447. 9 May 2024 Wah Fat Street 1
448. 9 May 2024 Tung Fuk Road 6
449. 13 May 2024 Yau Kom Tau 2
450. 14 May 2024 Ho Ying Road 1
451. 19 May 2024 To Yuen Street Playground 1
452. 21 May 2024 Hong Kong Stadium  2
453. 21 May 2024 Victoria Road 1
454. 21 May 2024 Nam Long Shan Road  2
455. 21 May 2024 Cape Road 2
456. 22 May 2024 Tai Po Hospital 1
457. 23 May 2024 Hong Kong Stadium 1
458. 23 May 2024 O King Road 4
459. 24 May 2024 Ho Ying Road 1
460. 24 May 2024 Peel Rise 1
461. 27 May 2024 Fanling 1
462. 28 May 2024 Ma Yau Tong 11
463. 29 May 2024 Nam Long Shan Road 2
464. 29 May 2024 Hong Kong Stadium 1
465. 30 May 2024 Mount Parker Road 7
466. 31 May 2024 Hong Kong Stadium 3
467. 3 June 2024 Fu Tei Road 1
468. 3 June 2024 Stanley 1
469. 5 June 2024 Tai Tan 1
470. 5 June 2024 Yau Sin Street 1
471. 6 June 2024 Sai Sha Road 1
472. 6 June 2024 Che Ha 1
473. 7 June 2024 Fanling 3
474. 13 June 2024 Lam Kam Road 3
475. 13 June 2024 Fu Tei Road 9
476. 13 June 2024 Tung Fuk Road 3
477. 13 June 2024 Shan Pui Road  1
478. 14 June 2024 Mount Parker Road 1
Total: 1,032
 
Please click the icon to download leaflet of "Hong Kong Wildlife: Wild Pig" 
 
 (PDF format, 1.2 Mb)
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